Govt set to Begin Payroll, Skills Audit

PUBLIC Service minister Elphas Mukonoweshuro on Wednesday said a national civil service payroll and skills audit will begin on November 30, but will exclude soldiers and other security personnel.

The minister said a pilot audit that started in Harare and Gweru on Monday ends today.
The audit followed concerns that the public service has on its books thousands of “ghost workers” drawing pay for no work.
Mukonoweshuro said: “The public service is conducting a payroll and skills audit with a view to revitalise the public service through the identification of public service strength, skills gaps and recommending measures for attracting and retaining qualified personnel in the service.
“The payroll and skills audit will cover all public servants regulated by the Public Service Act and the Health Services Act, excluding the uniformed forces and other security services.”
The head count, the first ever in the history of Zimbabwe, involves over 200 000 workers.
During the exercise, which will end on December 18, all civil servants will report to their respective pay stations carrying their birth and academic certificates.
They will also be required to produce letters of appointment, pay-slips and police clearance letters.
The payroll and skills audit is being conducted in terms of a government directive issued in April this year which mandated the public service ministry to conduct a human resource audit.
An inter-ministerial committee has been established to carry out the exercise, which is expected to gobble a total of US$4 million.
The committee has been tasked to audit the general manpower levels in order to flush out ghost workers, assess the skills levels, skills gaps and carry out a skills profile of Zimbabweans in the Diaspora who could be engaged to return to the country.
In April, government ordered the ministry of Public Service to conduct the payroll and skills audit to “establish the current status and future public service personnel need to enhance service delivery”.
The audit comes after another review for the first quota of the 2009 financial year by the government’s Auditor and Comptroller General Mildred Chiri. Chiri concluded that during last year’s presidential elections, the Youth ministry illegally employed 10 000 youths.
“Appointment procedures were not observed in the recruitment of 10 277 youth officers in May 2008 for the Ministry of Youth,” she said. “Youth officers who were on payroll yet having no requisite documentation evidence this. The appointment process was unprocedural as evidenced by the following irregularities: duplicated names and surnames with the same ID; individuals appearing in two ministries; no appointment documents; same date of birth for most employees.”
Mukonoweshuro down played media reports that his ministry had been asked by the World Bank to supply classified information relating to the identity of state workers.
“We have got three players here. We have got the ministry (Public Service) which runs with the mandate, the World Bank which funds and we have got an independent firm of auditors which takes instructions directly from the ministry together with ministry staff, to execute the audit,” he said.
“The World Bank only holds the purse. So any suggestion to the effect that the World Bank was asking for information is plainly and patently false, mischievous and malicious”. ––PUBLIC Service minister Elphas Mukonoweshuro on Wednesday said a national civil service payroll and skills audit will begin on November 30, but will exclude soldiers and other security personnel.
The minister said a pilot audit that started in Harare and Gweru on Monday ends today.
The audit followed concerns that the public service has on its books thousands of “ghost workers” drawing pay for no work.
Mukonoweshuro said: “The public service is conducting a payroll and skills audit with a view to revitalise the public service through the identification of public service strength, skills gaps and recommending measures for attracting and retaining qualified personnel in the service.
“The payroll and skills audit will cover all public servants regulated by the Public Service Act and the Health Services Act, excluding the uniformed forces and other security services.”
The head count, the first ever in the history of Zimbabwe, involves over 200 000 workers.
During the exercise, which will end on December 18, all civil servants will report to their respective pay stations carrying their birth and academic certificates.
They will also be required to produce letters of appointment, pay-slips and police clearance letters.
The payroll and skills audit is being conducted in terms of a government directive issued in April this year which mandated the public service ministry to conduct a human resource audit.
An inter-ministerial committee has been established to carry out the exercise, which is expected to gobble a total of US$4 million.
The committee has been tasked to audit the general manpower levels in order to flush out ghost workers, assess the skills levels, skills gaps and carry out a skills profile of Zimbabweans in the Diaspora who could be engaged to return to the country.
In April, government ordered the ministry of Public Service to conduct the payroll and skills audit to “establish the current status and future public service personnel need to enhance service delivery”.
The audit comes after another review for the first quota of the 2009 financial year by the government’s Auditor and Comptroller General Mildred Chiri. Chiri concluded that during last year’s presidential elections, the Youth ministry illegally employed 10 000 youths.
“Appointment procedures were not observed in the recruitment of 10 277 youth officers in May 2008 for the Ministry of Youth,” she said. “Youth officers who were on payroll yet having no requisite documentation evidence this. The appointment process was unprocedural as evidenced by the following irregularities: duplicated names and surnames with the same ID; individuals appearing in two ministries; no appointment documents; same date of birth for most employees.”
Mukonoweshuro down played media reports that his ministry had been asked by the World Bank to supply classified information relating to the identity of state workers.
“We have got three players here. We have got the ministry (Public Service) which runs with the mandate, the World Bank which funds and we have got an independent firm of auditors which takes instructions directly from the ministry together with ministry staff, to execute the audit,” he said.
“The World Bank only holds the purse. So any suggestion to the effect that the World Bank was asking for information is plainly and patently false, mischievous and malicious”. –– Staff Writer.