Mutambara Loses The Plot (again)

THE utterances made by Arthur Mutambara, leader of the smaller opposition faction of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) recently, in which he attacked Morgan Tsvangirai, leader of the larger MDC faction and published by the Herald (January 5) must not pass unchallenged.

 

Mutambara stated that Tsvangirai and his faction were under the influence of the West — the United States in particular.

According to Mutambara, it is the West and the US who want regime change in Zimbabwe and not the voter of March 29, 2008 or other millions of Zimbabweans who have been forced to seek refuge all over the world by the Mugabe regime’s policies.

I do not know if Mutambara is really incapable of reading the truth about the political crisis in Zimbabwe or that he is just trying to cement his political position that will come along with the so-called “inclusive government”.

I believe that it is apparent to most that the crisis in Zimbabwe has been authored by Mugabe’s rule or in this case misrule, and that the sooner Mugabe vacates the helm of Zimbabwean politics, the better for the suffering Zimbabweans.

Zimbabweans must thus dismiss Mutambara’s recent utterances as nonsense. Mutambara’s utterances are in fact an insult to the intelligence of the Zimbabwean electorate who voted loudly against both Mutambara and the Mugabe regime in the March 29 2008 election.

If one takes into account that Zimbabwean voters voted for Tsvangirai against a background where he was being labelled a puppet of the whites or the West, then one can conclude that the electorate reflected their fearless choice.

Since 1984, the Zimbabwean electorate has been flooded with Zanu PF propaganda that tries to dismiss genuine home-grown political opposition as puppets of Western imperialism. Opposition political parties or any other voice that thinks otherwise to Zanu PF have been interpreted as agents for the recolonisation of Zimbabwe.

Thankfully most voters realised that this was just a ploy and ignored this propaganda in the March 2008 election.

For Mutambara to repeat such a tired line only serves to reveal his political bankruptcy. The language that the United States is communicating to Mugabe is that he should follow a democratic route that he is obligated to follow.

It is clear that Mugabe and Mutambara both lost in the March 2008 elections and for them to be at the helm of Zimbabwean politics by any means is undemocratic. Those who lose elections must not retain power.

The US for all its controversial foreign policies is a shining example of internal democracy to the whole world in as far as the conduct of free and fair elections are concerned. Elections are conducted freely, fairly, without fear, coercion and violence as is the case in Zimbabwe.

Power is handed over to the winner without bloodshed and the losers have the grace to congratulate the winner.

It is my belief therefore that the US has the moral high ground to take such a position about a nation that administers democracy in such a manner as Zimbabwe.

My challenge to Mutambara is that if he thinks that his political ideology has any takers he should try to contest for any election in Zimbabwe and find out the truth for himself.

Otherwise it seems the only way he can attain political power is through such a deal as the envisioned inclusive government or through leading a breakaway faction of a political formation.

Stanley Tapfumaneyi Tapera,
Harare.