New currency damning song on cards

Itai Mushekwe



OUTSPOKEN Canadian-based musician Viomak has responded swiftly to government’s recent introduction of a new currency through a damning song titled
>Gono Bvisa Father Zero
(Gono remove Father Zero), an indirect reference to President Robert Mugabe.


The song, whose lyrics are pregnant with political vitriol, places Reserve Bank governor Gideon Gono and Mugabe on the firing line dismissing the currency reform as a cosmetic move aimed at buying time for Mugabe.


The musician, who has grown to be one of Mugabe’s trenchant critics in the arts world due to his skewed policies that have left Zimbabweans living from hand-to-mouth, told Independent Xtra this week that the song is an addition to her upcoming album, Happy 83rd Birthday President Mugabe (Bones of a 30-year old) due for recording this month in South Africa.


The release of the album will coincide with Mugabe’s birthday celebration next year.


“Gono should understand that the problem is not the zeros but Mugabe,” said the artist. “It’s impossible to find a solution to an unresolved problem. The problem is still pending and there’s no way he can get a viable and workable solution without solving the problem. There’s no point in sweeping the ashes without extinguishing the fire. This is just a ploy to steal monies from the ordinary person.”


Gono last week slashed the country’s currency by three zeros with Mugabe’s blessing through the Presidential Powers (Temporary Measures) (Currency Revaluation) Regulations 2006, a measure government claims will wrestle skyrocketing inflation and corruption rampant among “influential figures”.


Scores of people have lost millions of dollars since the launch of the ongoing currency reform operation codenamed Project Sunrise with police seizing money in excess of $100 million from individuals at roadblocks dotted throughout the country.


Lyrics to the song go thus: “Iwe Gono bvisa Mugabe, iwe Gono siya mazero. Mazero haana mhosva.” (Gono remove Mugabe and not the zeros, zeros are not the problem).


The musician also indicated that she is coming to Zimbabwe this month despite receiving threats from suspected government secret agents for her forthright songs, which attack Mugabe and his ruling Zanu PF.


Viomak sings political gospel music for a cause she claims to be charity work aimed at benefiting the less-privileged, while also using her voice to preach against oppression and economic hardships which Zimbabweans have had to put up with for the past six years.


To date she has disbursed a significant amount of donations to organisations such as Matthew Rusike Children’s Home, Mutemwa Leprosy Centre and a few months ago $90 million to New Hope Zimbabwe.