No easy mission

Enock Muchinjo

THE Sables’ tie against Senegal in Harare next week is not an easy mission for Zimbabwe as they kick-start their World Cup qualifying campaign.



ial, Helvetica, sans-serif”>A match for Zimbabweans against any of the African sides, excluding South Africa, Namibia and Morocco, up to the 1990s, used to provide the Sables with an opportunity for an all-afternoon of show-off and display of difference in class.


Things have changed as African teams have improved on their rugby, and their awareness of the game and technique have become more polished.

The reason for this transformation is mainly because rugby can easily be learnt by Africans because of their physical strength, which allows for powerful forward play, and the natural grace, which works very well for back play.


Last week, Senegal beat Zambia to advance to the next stage, where they take on the Zimbabweans. Zambia is an improving side, and for Senegal to beat them means the West Africans are not a bad outfit.


Furthermore, most of the Senegalese players are based in France where they play in some leagues there.


There is no excuse for Zimbabwe to lose, though. Years of experience, home advantage, and superior quality should see the Sables sail through.


The Zimbabwe team has not been finalised, but the old guard of utility forward Rocky Gurumani, prop Clint Joseph and fullback Emmanuel Munyoro is expected to lead a generally young side.


Zimbabwe are launching yet another World Cup campaign after three previous failed attempts.


Local rugby has gone through difficulties in the last 10 years. Sponsors have left and there has been a huge player exodus.


But a number of locals still believe in the game, and next Saturday people will come to see how their favourite team will dispatch the visitors.