Zanu PF’s brand of democracy

DEMOCARACY is far from being practised in the ruling Zanu PF.


The party leadership has a tradition of imposing and appointing people at will. President Mugabe him

self is a master of the game.


In the early 1990s, he imposed his late wife Sally to head the Women’s

League at the expense of Joyce Mujuru and Julia Zvobgo who were the real people’s choices.


Fifteen years later, he has imposed the same Mujuru whom he dismissed with contempt when she challenged the late Sally.


Mai Mujuru is well-versed in the undemocratic principles of the current leadership.


Professor Jonathan Moyo and other victims of the Tsholotsho indaba were just trying to introduce democracy in the ruling party.


Any democratic gathering could have encountered a similar fate whether it was held in Mazowe, Harare, Zvimba or ngale eTsholotsho.


Primary elections should have been held for even the top party posts.

It is unfortunate that Moyo associated himself with the current leadership. He should have continued as an academic.


He however still has a chance of cleansing himself of the Zanu PF muddy waters and resuscitate his academic career.


Some sections of the media have been accusing Moyo of snubbing Mujuru’s celebrations in Hwange and the launch of the Zanu PF manifesto. The question I would like to pose is: Was Moyo invited to attend these functions?


I was under the impression that only Zanu PF candidates and their supporters were invited to attend.


During his address, President Mugabe and vice-president Joseph Msika indirectly castigated Moyo. The two leaders turned the gathering into an anti-Moyo campaign. How could Moyo have attended such an event?

You might despise or admire the professor, the fact remains that the man is a hard worker.


Remember how he managed to compile the party’s 2000 election manifesto and all the literature during the 2002 presidential election.


This year, the Zanu PF information department under the leadership of Nathan Shamuyarira and Ephraim Masawi failed to publish the manifesto in time.


Can people such as Masawi write a manifesto?


For those concerned with Moyo’s political history, please ask Didymus

Mutasa.


At a public gathering at the Jameson Hotel in 1990, Mutasa said he welcomed criticism from Moyo because “Jonathan is our son. He was with us in Tanzania.”


PL Phiri,

Harare.