Media should take the judiciary to task

THANK you for putting up a good fight through these trying times. Your paper provides a breath of fresh air to us in exile. I just wanted to air my views and hopefully open up meaningful debate without getting you (editor or staff) into t

rouble.


Through all the turmoil experienced in our beautiful country there has been a disturbing trend whereby the judiciary has been seen to be compliant with the dictates of Zanu PF through apparent omission or commission — a prominent case in point being the tendency for judges to reserve judgement in sensitive cases.


One current example is the case of Zimbabweans in exile who sought recourse through the courts hoping to be granted the right to vote. Now it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that judgement in a matter as urgent as this should be given priority under normal circumstances.

My question is why hasn’t the independent press both in and outside Zimbabwe raised an outcry at some of the excesses of the judiciary?


I believe that when the judiciary uses technicalities to conspire with the oppressors to perpetuate further oppression, it is the duty of the independent media and other voices of the voiceless to raise concerns and in the process invite the attention of the rest of the world, even at the risk of being prosecuted for perceived contempt of court.


In instances when the government decides not to publish findings of commissions of inquiry, the independent press makes a lot of noise. Why don’t they make the same noise when a judgement is reserved, especially when such an outcome benefits the ruling party?


Judges in Zimbabwe are not holy and history will one day force them to account for their actions. One hopes that the independent media is keeping a tally of abuses committed through judicial cowardice so that when that day comes, it will make our work easier. I rest my case.


Judgement Day,

Canada.