MDC expecting too much

THE issue of the MDC announcing that it intends to change mediators in the Zimbabwe political crisis reveals shocking infancy in the way the opposition goes about its business.



a, sans-serif”>To begin with, the opposition for a period in excess of six months prior to the election pursued a line of principled benchmark demands from government as preconditions for its participation in the poll.


They then changed their mind and went into the election “under protest” and were massacred 78 to 41, giving the ruling party a two thirds majority, a leverage they have always needed to shape and control political events in the country when need be to suit their draconian whims.



By participating in the poll, the MDC endorsed the process in its entirety, a move that they should have avoided until they were fully convinced the process would be free from manipulation and the outcome would be a reflection of the will of the electorate.


The opposition was aware that the show was a mere formality but still went on to participate against a principled stand they had taken for more than five months. Today, that same opposition goes about making scathing attacks on neighbouring South Africa in a show of pure infantile emotion.


The house that needs sorting is not that of South Africa but of Zimbabwe and more importantly, the two houses of its main political parties. To suggest that President Thabo Mbeki should have come out in full support of the MDC is to show a shallow understanding of the diplomatic relationship of necessity that underpins the way governments relate to each other.


To suggest that Mbeki should have dismissed the outcome of the poll as unfair is tantamount to ignoring the immediate need for option B that presents itself at the end of those words.


If Mbeki had said the election was unfair for example, what would he do next? Would he then apply sanctions on Zimbabwe knowing fully well the only people that suffer would be the masses?


Would he give air space and support to the US and UK to launch an onslaught on Zimbabwe because of their hostilities over the land reform? What would that make of Mbeki — or indeed any African who gets indoctrinated by Europeans into fighting for an end in which Africans are the losers?


Does the MDC really think that the British, New Zealanders, Australians and Americans are in it because Zimbabwe, a southern African country, is grappling with a dictatorship?


Who knighted President Mugabe? Is it not the Queen when President Mugabe was still “selling out”?


By hobnobbing with a bunch of whites, a group of countries known for their unjustified hostility towards non-White states, MDC leader Morgan Tsvangirai is truly playing a “Tea Boy” role and soon the countries that surround him will brand him so.


It is important that Tsvangirai and his team reconsider their statement and be realistic about how far Mbeki can go as president of a country that benefited from a Zanu PF government that so abhorred apartheid in the former’s fight for democracy.


The MDC should be aware that an opposition that will be allowed to assume the reins of power in Zimbabwe and southern Africa for up to 20 years from now, will fight its war for power in the context of acknowledging that it is too premature to entrust the British and their allies with the affairs of a country snatched from them.


Zimbabwe still has to rid itself of Zanu PF as it has to do with the unfair economic controls that still inhibit the maximum use of our wealth for the benefit of our economies across Africa. We need to indigenise our wealth and that effort runs parallel with the expeditionary interests of Western governments.


To allow British premier Tony Blair to meddle in our issues is like hiring the witch doctor that cursed us to prescribe our traditional relief. South Africa and our neighbours are our true friends. Let’s involve them. We get nothing but bloodshed from Anglo/American interventions and the ones that die is us.


Courage Shumba,

UK.