Yearning for the good times at Textbook Sales

TEXTBOOK Sales was the leading bookseller and stationer in Zimbabwe prior to its acquisition by government after Mutumwa Mawere had gone into exile.

Since then, we have had to  endure miserable lives and our conditions of service have deteriorated. Workers holding imp

ortant positions are earning paltry salaries of $3,5 million per month.

Nothing seems to be functioning properly; shop shelves are virtually empty and there is no restocking. Sales staff are not doing what they should be doing: visiting schools and companies marketing company products.

We are told there is no money, but what baffles us is why government would acquire a company and then claim lack of funds. If there was no money to run the company, why acquire it in the first place?

Workers find it difficult to accept that lame excuse of lack of funds and are prepared to embark on some action which may embarrass the government unless something is done urgently.

The government should have let private companies take over the company, instead of giving workers some false sense of salvation.

We wonder why the acting managing director holds meetings with accounting staff every week

instead of strategising with regional managers who are well-versed with the selling and marketing of company products? Because Textbook Sales is a retail organisation, workers believe that regional managers, branch managers and sales representatives should always be involved in the formulation of plans for the way forward. Accounts personnel cannot, and should not play that role.

We look forward to the time when Textbook Sales will regain its market share and revert to its envied status of the leading bookseller in Zimbabwe. 

Unhappy workers.