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Hiring the best job candidates

Memory Nguwi
“After obtaining basic information about candidates’ abilities, standard interviews only accounted for 8% of the differences in performance and productivity.

Think about it this way: imagine that you interviewed 100 candidates, ranked them in order from best to worst, and then measured their actual performance in the job.

You’d be lucky if you put more than eight in the right spot.”

Job interviews have become predictable and ineffective – Here Are 10 Ways to Change That by Dr John Sullivan
https://drjohnsullivan.com/articles/job-interviews-become-predictable-ineffective-10-ways-change/
In this article, Dr John Sullivan shares evidence on why the interview in its current form is a terrible selection tool. He goes to give solutions to address the shortcomings.

“For example, Leadership IQ found that and an astounding 46% of all new hires fail within 18 months. Google research found that the unstructured interviews used by most simply don’t predict on-the-job performance.

Here’s what Google found: “Interviews are a terrible predictor of performance.”

“Many managers, recruiters, and HR staffers think they have a special ability to sniff out talent. They’re wrong… It’s a complete random mess… We found a zero relationship.” (Laszlo Bock) “

11. Hiring isn’t rocket science: Why the most boring strategy is best by Laszlo Bock https://behavioralscientist.org/hiring-isnt-rocket-science-why-the-most-boring-strategy-is-best.

This article is about correcting the common flaws found in job interviews.

If you want to realign your interview process this is the right article for you.

Here is what the author said.

“Which brings us to interviews.

Asking behavioural questions (something like, “Give me an example of a time when you solved an analytically difficult problem”) will get you two kinds of information: one is you get to see how the candidate interacted in a real-world situation, and the valuable “meta” information you get about the candidate is a sense of what they consider to be difficult.

“Ask candidates a consistent set of questions, in the same order, with clear criteria to assess the quality of responses.

This ensures that any variation in responses is a result of the candidate’s performance, not because an interviewer has particularly high or low standards, or asked harder or easier questions.”

Experience doesn’t predict a new hire’s success by Alison Beard
https://hbr.org/2019/09/experience-doesnt-predict-a-new-hires-success
When hiring new employees do not bank too much on experience.

In this article, Alison Beard using solid scientific research found no link between experience and job performance.

These findings should allow you to rethink your recruitment and selection process.

“Chad H. Van Iddekinge of Florida State University and his colleagues reviewed 81 studies to investigate the link between an employee’s prior work experience and his or her performance in a new organization.

They found no significant correlation between the two. Even when people had completed tasks, held roles, or worked in functions or industries relevant to their current ones, it did not translate into better performance.

The conclusion: Experience doesn’t predict a new hire’s success.”
How do you hire and retain top talent?“After obtaining basic information about candidates’ abilities, standard interviews only accounted for 8% of the differences in performance and productivity.

Think about it this way: imagine that you interviewed 100 candidates, ranked them in order from best to worst, and then measured their actual performance in the job.

You’d be lucky if you put more than eight in the right spot.”

Job interviews have become predictable and ineffective – Here Are 10 Ways to Change That by Dr John Sullivan
https://drjohnsullivan.com/articles/job-interviews-become-predictable-ineffective-10-ways-change/
In this article, Dr John Sullivan shares evidence on why the interview in its current form is a terrible selection tool. He goes to give solutions to address the shortcomings.

“For example, Leadership IQ found that and an astounding 46% of all new hires fail within 18 months.

Google research found that the unstructured interviews used by most simply don’t predict on-the-job performance.

Here’s what Google found: “Interviews are a terrible predictor of performance.”

“Many managers, recruiters, and HR staffers think they have a special ability to sniff out talent.

They’re wrong… It’s a complete random mess… We found a zero relationship.” (Laszlo Bock) “
11. Hiring isn’t rocket science: Why the most boring strategy is best by Laszlo Bock https://behavioralscientist.org/hiring-isnt-rocket-science-why-the-most-boring-strategy-is-best/
This article is about correcting the common flaws found in job interviews.

If you want to realign your interview process this is the right article for you.

Here is what the author said.
“Which brings us to interviews.

Asking behavioural questions (something like, “Give me an example of a time when you solved an analytically difficult problem”) will get you two kinds of information: one is you get to see how the candidate interacted in a real-world situation, and the valuable “meta” information you get about the candidate is a sense of what they consider to be difficult.

“Ask candidates a consistent set of questions, in the same order, with clear criteria to assess the quality of responses.

This ensures that any variation in responses is a result of the candidate’s performance, not because an interviewer has particularly high or low standards, or asked harder or easier questions.”

Experience doesn’t predict a new hire’s success by Alison Beard
https://hbr.org/2019/09/experience-doesnt-predict-a-new-hires-success
When hiring new employees do not bank too much on experience.

In this article, Alison Beard using solid scientific research found no link between experience and job performance. These findings should allow you to rethink your recruitment and selection process.

“Chad H. Van Iddekinge of Florida State University and his colleagues reviewed 81 studies to investigate the link between an employee’s prior work experience and his or her performance in a new organization.

They found no significant correlation between the two.

Even when people had completed tasks, held roles, or worked in functions or industries relevant to their current ones, it did not translate into better performance.

The conclusion: Experience doesn’t predict a new hire’s success.”
 How do you hire and retain top talent?
Once talent has been hired, the next question is on how to retain them.Once you get the best talent, you can invest in the retention of these people knowing that you did get the best and they will give you the best value.There is no point in investing in retention strategies to retain people who do not add value to your business.

  • Nguwi is an occupational psychologist, data scientist, speaker and managing consultant at Industrial Psychology Consultants (Pvt) Ltd, a management and HR consulting firm. — ipcconsultants.com
  • Memory Nguwi is an Occupational Psychologist, Data Scientist, Speaker, & Managing Consultant- Industrial Psychology Consultants (Pvt) Ltd, a management and human resources consulting firm. https://www.thehumancapitalhub.com  email: mnguwi@ipcconsultants.com

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