Battle on the cards

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Bangladesh batsmen finally gave Zimbabwe bowlers the test befitting a Test match on day one of the second match albeit with the aid of sloppy fielding by the hosts to brighten prospects of a real contest in the next four days.

Report by Kevin Mapasure

The tourists’ four changes from the team that lost by 335 runs in the first Test inspired better resolve and conviction with the bat as they were in control on 300-6 at stumps, following a recovery from early wobbles in the first two sessions.

After the first three wickets of Jahurul Islam (24), Mohammad Ashraful (4) and Tamim Iqbal (49) fell, one would have been tempted to think Bangladesh were sliding towards another characteristic collapse, but Shakib Al Hasan (81) and Mushfiqur Rahim (60) both hit half centuries in a 123-run fifth wicket stand as Zimbabwe’s four-man pace attack toiled in the final session.

The story of the day for the hosts was one of missed chances with no less than five catching and run out chances going to waste, with Graeme Cremer most liable.

Having gone for tea on 171-4 Bangladesh upped the ante in the final session where they scored 129 runs for the loss of two wickets.
Going into this Test the tourists needed to find a way to play Kyle Jarvis, destructive with the ball in the first Test, and they did exactly that by hitting the paceman for 85 runs in his 18 overs.
But they could not keep him quiet all day as he struck late by trapping Mushfiqur Rahim.

Nasir Hossain and Ziaur Rahman were unbeaten on 37 from 39 and eight from 20 balls respectively.

Elton Chigumbura claimed two scalps at the expense of 59 runs in 18 overs while Keegan Meth was thrifty, ending with 1-22 in 16 overs.
Earlier Zimbabwe captain Brendan Taylor had won the toss and sent in the tourists to bat, with openers Iqbal and Jahurul Islam providing a solid start.

Cremer fumbled the first chance when he dropped Jahurul Islam who had scored one run after Meth had enticed an edge, but the seamer was not to be denied that wicket getting his man after 13,2 overs.

A lot was expected of Mohammed Ashraful in this Test after the first, but he was to disappoint again when he fell to Shingi Masakadza attempting a pull only to edge it to Cremer and this time it stuck.

Just when Iqbal was threatening to score the first half century for the tourists in this series at 49 he was run out by Shingi Masakadza and Bangladesh’s chances of a big score looked to have diminished considerably.

Chigumbura, bowling so well and unfortunate to have gone that far without wickets, was finally rewarded when he removed Mominul Haque.

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