Zifa receives Warriors kit offer

Zifa has begun the search for a national teams kit sponsor and will soon put the deal to tender despite claims by the mother body that it has already received interest from two companies.

A source this week told IndependentSport that Puma, which also kit out Bafana Bafana, contacted Zifa chief executive officer Jonathan Mashingaidze last week through one of its liasons looking at discussing a possible deal.

Nothing much was discussed about that particular deal but the Zimbabwe Football Trust has since appointed a subcommittee to work on the documentation to invite tenders.

Zifa tried in vain two years ago to lure Puma but is confident this time will succeed.

Mashingaidze could not be drawn into discussing the Puma deal but confirmed that they would be floating the tender adding that a couple of companies had already shown interest.

“Our brand is rising and most of these big companies have been watching. We are confident that if we put it to tender we will get a favourable deal,” said Mashingaidze.

“We are trying as much to avoid what happened with the Legea deal, for example, where people just brought in a couple of kit sets and nothing else. We want to get a proper deal where we will get kit for all national teams as well as replicas for the fans. In addition to that, as is the norm, we should be entitled to some financial support.”

The Warriors have a World Cup qualifier against Egypt at the end of the month and the Trust is busy mobilising US$200 000 for the team.
After that the team has a scheduled trip to the Caribbean where they have been invited on an all-expenses, paid trip to play five international friendlies.

According to Mashingaidze, Zifa has already received a proposal from a company called +One which wants to kit the Warriors on that trip, as a first step towards a long-term deal.

Meanwhile, Zimbabwe Football Trust chairperson, Tshinga Dube told IndependentSport that the task of mobilising funds to, among other things, offset Zifa’s crippling debt, is a difficult one but one they have set out to achieve.

“Our target is to clean up this whole thing; it’s a complicated and long process but we are trying to assist Zifa in this difficult task,” said Dube. “We have just been registered and are just settling in but we are not lagging behind. We have already begun work. Our best bet is to get all patriotic Zimbabweans to help us; everybody has to come on board. Zifa is US$4 million in debt. We shouldn’t have a problem raising the US$200 000 needed for the Egypt trip but as a long-term project we have to come up with strategies on how we can raise money. If Zimbabweans are not forthcoming we will fail and our image will remain bad.”