Radar’s profit hopes go up in smoke

‘OBSERVERS”, we are told (Herald, Monday) believe Sadc and the AU should take the MDC-T to task for “reneging on its GPA obligations while hiding behind the finger that they had no influence on British foreign policy”.

Among these “observers” is “analyst” Christopher Mutsvangwa. The British had let “the cat out of the bag”, he declared, in regard to recent statements by David Miliband in the House of Commons.
Mutsvangwa and other Zanu PF supporters posing as analysts should be instructed on what is happening here.
The British and others are only too aware that President Mugabe and his followers have refused to implement key aspects of the GPA. These include the role of AG Johannes Tomana and RBZ governor Gideon Gono.
President Jacob Zuma thinks these two can be “parked” somewhere. But Tomana’s performance in the state’s prosecution of Roy Bennett shows that problems left unresolved remain a danger to the GNU.
The court accepted this week that the state’s star witness, Peter Hitschmann, had been tortured prior to statements he had made. But still the case staggers on.
Mugabe has an unambiguous obligation to appoint as ministers individuals drawn up by the MDC-T. It is not his job to decide whether they are acceptable to him or not.
The same goes for Zimbabwe’s ambassador to Pretoria.
That appointment should be decided in consultation with the GNU partners.
The British, the EU and the US understand this. By referring to the role of the MDC-T, Miliband is saying that decisions such as the lifting of sanctions will be taken only when the partners in government agree there is evidence of reform.
That is clearly not the case at present. Zanu PF is blocking reform every step of the way. The MDC-T for their part are constantly giving hostages to fortune. They need to spell out that so long as the causes of sanctions remain, it is impossible to agree to their lifting
Every time Zanu PF demands that sanctions should be lifted, the MDC-T needs to insist on the removal of controls on the media and violent farm disruptions. Deputy secretary for information and publicity Ephraim Masawi on Wednesday spoke of the MDC-T’s “treacherous role” in the initiation of sanctions.
“The people of Zimbabwe, as the victims of MDC-T and Western murderous collusion now demand that Mr Tsvangirai and his Western allies remove their evil sanctions so that children can go to school, the sick can be attended to in hospitals, people can find jobs and farmers produce.”
What “murderous collusion” is he talking about? It was the MDC-T that lost 200 supporters in the 2008 elections when Zanu PF’s murderous gangs were on the loose. And the public, who largely voted against Zanu PF’s blandishments, associate the collapse of the schools and hospitals with Zanu PF’s reign. It is the MDC-T which has engineered recovery in the education and health sectors. But we agree with Masawi that it is currently impossible for farmers to produce.

A free press and the safety of property are fundamental to a democratic society. There must be an end to subornment of the state media as illustrated by disingenuous remarks about “pirate” radio stations.
These will disappear once Zimbabwe is free and political infiltration is removed, as required by the GPA.

Muckraker has a theory that once individuals leap aboard Zanu PF’s threadbare bandwagon, they are given an injection that makes them say really stupid things.
We had Mutsvangwa talking about Jan van Riebeeck at the Quill Club last Friday. He seemed to think this was a reasonable topic for an audience of journalists.
He is also a big fan of China but doesn’t seem to appreciate that the Chinese are expanding on the Western model of trade and investment — the opposite of Zimbabwe.
Then there was SK Moyo speaking to Zanu PF’s Youth League. He had obviously been given the same shot by the men in white coats and started rambling about the transitional government. “But we do not have transitional diplomatic posts,” he added.
“All the noise about the South African ambassadorial position is useless because ambassadors are appointed by the president and commander in chief of the Zimbabwe Defence Forces.”
So, not much consultation there!
Then John Nkomo emerged from the same clinic. Youths should unite to shame Zimbabwe’s detractors, he declared.
“Efforts are there to divide us for regime change purposes but let’s remain united. If you girls and boys sleep out there our heritage will go.”
Where was “out there”, we asked ourselves? And did “our heritage” include electoral violence as exhibited in 2008?
Muckraker would welcome suggestions from readers of evidence of victims of the party jab!
Nkomo, by the way, told the youths they were free to disagree with the party.
Dissent is welcome, he said, “but it must never be acrimonious or antagonistic and must never interfere with official party or government business”.
So what does that leave? And he repeated that funny charge that the West was “causing confusion”.

Zanu PF has always had particular difficulty with people “causing confusion” and it is a serious charge to make within the party. The comrades are easily confused.
But observers should take note of a sinister claim by Nkomo. “Once party structures are efficiently and effectively organised and mobilised, setbacks experienced during the March harmonised elections will not be repeated,” he said.

We note that Ignatious Chombo is threatening to reimpose commissions on town councils he regards as corrupt.
If he has evidence of corruption he should produce it and not use it as a smokescreen for disregarding the electoral verdict of voters. Can’t he get it into his head that nobody wants Zanu PF back in power, either through the front door of parliamentary elections or the back door of local government. How well did his commissioners perform the last time? Anybody remember Sekesai Makwavarara?
Meanwhile, we are still waiting to hear how many farms Chombo has. His “forensic teams” need to have a look there.

The following is a statement from the German embassy in Harare.
“Contrary to a report in the Sunday Mail of 24 February, donors have not suspended funding of the constitutional process. This article is misleading and not based on facts,” said German Ambassador Albrecht Conze, speaking in his capacity as current Chair of the ‘Friends of Zimbabwe’ Group.
“The international community remains committed to support the people-driven constitution-making process which is vital for the country’s future political stability.
“We have agreed to disburse funding towards workplans and budgets prepared by the Constitutional and Parliamentary Affairs Committee,” said Ambassador Conze. “Donors are waiting to meet with representatives from government, parliament and civil society to consider the first workplan.”