New Album in the Works – Nzira

AFTER residing in Cape Town, South Africa, for almost a year now — away from his “supportive and appreciative fans” — Gorden Taurai Nzira has seen it fit to embark on his latest musical project which he says will be a testament to the experiences he has gone through as an artist and individual.


“I am working on my third album which I am yet to give a title. This is because of the many issues that I need the album to address owing to my experiences back home and here in Cape Town and also the inspiration from above,” Nzira said.

Among the issues the album will deal with, Nzira said, are hope in the midst of turmoil and the need for mankind to have a deeper connection with God.

The talents of Sani and Delani Makhalima, Flash Gordon and South African producer Allou April will be incorporated into the project along with a number of South African artists. He anticipates releasing the album in December.

Comparing the Zimbabwean and South African music industries, Nzira said South African musicians have the advantage of the numerous radio stations dotted around the country — from community-based stations to national ones.

“In the Western Cape, I know of a gospel radio station that broadcasts to a province of more than four million people; this means gospel musicians in the province can enjoy airplay without any competition from circular music, so there can be as many (stations) as can swim in the waters.”

“I dream of a Zimbabwe where there are several radio stations, where each genre can have its own radio station. We need the law and policies drawn up to allow this, and the investors to support it.”

He said while the local radio stations play so much of South African music be it gospel, afro pop, hip hop or even jazz, South African radio stations do not play Zimbabwean music at all because they have enough competition amongst themselves.

“It makes me think that the 100% local content idea was not so bad after all — even if it was a bit extreme — but the idea of more local music playing on radios was noble. The quality of music in our country is improving and I don’t see the reason why we should not play and more and more of it”.

BY NGONI MUZOFA

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