Time To Get Off The Fence

THE Zimbabwean land grab, followed by the collapse of the economy has over the last eight years disrupted many lives.

 

Its effect was the primary cause that necessitated re-location by most citizens. From this development emerged two distinct groups — those that went abroad and those that chose to stay.

Given this picture, we again clearly discern between those that battled along doing an honest day’s work and those that chose to collaborate with the oppressors, under the pretext of survival. The latter enriched themselves whilst knowingly contributing to sustain the effects of this notorious regime.

It is too often expressed that in the new Zimbabwe, those that stayed should be considered before those who were absent. With the imminent return to a proper democratic society, those that contributed to its delay should not be surprised when reminded of that very fact. In the meantime those advocating for a truth and reconciliation commission need to be equally reminded that it is not an exercise upon which the slate is simply wiped clean.

The two political forces are about to battle it out this June in the form of a presidential poll run-off.

Those that choose to remain on the fence need appreciate that they are likely to subsequently find themselves in that very position, left high and dry.

Cota Borgo,

Harare.