If Tommy Hilfiger was not a designer

FASHION designer Tommy Hilfiger says that if he had not ended up making clothes he probably would have made movies.


Known for a style that evokes the American East coast with his New England-inspired designs, Hilfiger says he cou

ld imagine himself on the West coast, behind or in front of the camera.


Hilfiger was in Stockholm for a promotional visit and he spoke to Reuters about his life and ideas. Dressed in loafers (no socks, despite the Nordic city’s autumnal chill), jeans and a pale blue Oxford shirt, Hilfiger said he likes the “classic” look for himself, not just his customers.


Q: What would you do if you hadn’t become a designer?


A: I’d have been in Hollywood as a producer, actor, director, something like that.


Q: What kind of movies would you make?


A: Movies with thought, with deep meaning . . . It would be something deep about the world, how to help the world, how to help (alleviate) poverty.


Q: What will you do here in Stockholm?


A: We’re going to go look at all the different talents, and give them advice. Probably more commercial, because they are creative already. I’ll tell them how to take the creativity to make money.


Q: What advice would have been helpful to you 40 years ago?


A: I think I was smart enough to surround myself with good people . . . But if someone would have told me that earlier, I don’t know if I would have listened, because sometimes you don’t know what good people represent. Thirty years ago good people were my friends who liked to hang around, listen to music and look cool and pick up girls. But now I look at people’s intelligence, how they can help me. Maybe they’re international tax lawyers or accountants. Still good people but a whole different mindset.


Q: If you could do anything different, what would that be?


A: Maybe I wouldn’t have gone so big in the States. I became so big in the States, and everything that becomes so big has to come down a little. I would have kept the supply less than the demand. Once you oversupply, the demand dries out.


Q: How do you think fashion has changed during your years in the industry?


A: A lot more competition. A lot more at the high end and a lot more at the low . . . Fashion itself comes in many different ways. There is fantasy fashion that not many people can wear or could afford. Then there is wearable fashion that is just part of our everyday life. It depends on the definition of fashion – fashion is usually guided by trend, but style is forever.


Q: What should we be looking for come Spring 2008?


A: Still luxury, colour, very, very light-weight fabrics and some shiny fabrics. For women, more lady-like clothes. For men. more tailored, more dressed up, more sophisticated, slimmer, closer to the body. — Reuters.