US$22m needed before Ekusileni Hospital reopens

Roadwin Chirara

EKUSILENI Hospital in Bulawayo requires about US$22 million before it can reopen its doors to the public in January next year.



sans-serif”>Ekusileni briefly opened its doors to the public in 2004 before it was closed after it was discovered that the equipment was obsolete.


Executive director of Ekusileni Hospital, Daud Dube, said the hospital required recapitalisation before it could resume operations in January.


“We have set January next year as the likely date for reopening but as you know we have not been operating and the hospital now requires US$22 million,” Dube said.


He said the hospital board would meet and decide how to go about raising the required money.


“The chairperson of the hospital is in a better position to comment on that. All I can say is we have a board meeting coming up, that is when we are going to decide how we will raise the required finds,” said Dube.


Dube said they were working towards purchasing the required equipment before the hospital can reopen.


“We have dealt with the issues of the equipment and other matters regarding differences within the board over fees to be charged. There really is nothing to talk about as there were no so-called problems,” said Dube.


He said the hospital had renewed its technical partnership with the United States-based medical school – Harvard Medical International.


“We have renewed our agreement with Harvard and they are happy with what we are doing. We signed the new agreement last week,” Dube said.

Harvard, as part of the technical agreement, agreed to facilitate the setting up of a public medical school at the hospital.


Ekusileni chairperson, Rosemary Mazula, refused to comment on how the hospital would raise money.


“We have a board meeting this week. Only after that will I be in a position to comment,” Mazula said.


The upmarket hospital was built in honour of the late Vice-President Joshua Nkomo, with funding from the National Social Security Authority. It was completed at a total cost of $2 billion in 2003.


On completion, the medical centre was expected to provide facilities for a medical school, specialising in physiotherapy and pathology.


President Robert Mugabe has taken over as the patron of the hospital after the death of Nkomo who was the hospital’s founding chairman.