The irony in Stamps’ quotations

I WOULD like to thank Muckraker (Independent, October 8) for drawing my attention to the fact that Dr Timothy Stamps, health adviser in the Office of the President and Cabinet, had replied to my recent letter – albeit a typically evasive

response that was published in the Sunday Mail.


Muckraker is absolutely correct when he suggests that “the last thing our correspondent wants are the prayers of somebody who kneels aboard the gravy train”.


Judging by both his original article and his subsequent letter, it would seem that Dr Stamps has little to do other than ingest large doses of quotations.

Some might suggest that an excessive use of quotations indicates an inability for original thought.


Others might be inclined to suggest that loyal Zanu PF party functionaries choke on a daily diet of quotations from genuinely heroic figures noted for their contributions to the service of humanity.


Presumably, Dr Stamps is so blinded by his loyalty to those who permit him to ride the gravy train that he does not see the irony in using quotations from famous individuals renowned for qualities that are the very antithesis of everything that Zanu PF represents.


Dr Stamps states that his initial reaction to my letter was to take Winston Churchill’s advice and “not to bother about dealing with this barking dog”. Some might say: “better a ‘barking dog’ than a presidential poodle”.


He states that “the whole point” of his article in the Sunday Mail was that “we will be remembered as heroes solely by what we have done for others, to uplift and console them”.


I agree, Dr Stamps. But perhaps you can explain to millions of suffering Zimbabweans just exactly what it is that you and the rest of Zanu PF have done to “uplift and console them”.


I understand clearly what Zanu PF chefs and their cronies have done to “uplift and console” each other, but I have difficulty in appreciating just how their dedication and devotion to selfless public service has benefited us ordinary mortals.


Dr Stamps claims that the publication of my letter in which I criticised the “self-serving hypocrisy” of his original article “is surely one hallmark of a free society”. What are the other “hallmarks of a free society”, Dr Stamps and do they exist in Zimbabwe?


There are many potentially embarrassing questions that could be asked of Dr Stamps, but I shall limit myself to just one, given that he “prays that God may heal me of obvious bitterness”. Yes I am bitter that this regime has brought so much destruction on this country and in the process ruined the lives of millions of its citizens.


My question, Dr Stamps, is very simple. How can anyone who claims to be a Christian belong to, and actively support a party that has been directly and deliberately responsible for so much human suffering – death, starvation, rape, torture, arbitrary arrests and detention?


When on your knees on board the gravy train have you forgotten the two most important of God’s commandments?


RES Cook,

Harare.