What we need is a political solution

ECONOMIC commentator Eric Bloch’s call for an economic recovery programme is undisputable, but his claim that “the recent parliamentary election will not have any material effect on economic recovery if government addresses fu

ndamental economic issues” (“Bloch gives roadmap to economic recovery”, (Zimbabwe Independent, April 15) is as much disputable as the election itself.


It is quite surprising that most of the things that Bloch urges the regime to redress as part of the economic recovery programme have all turned out to be a raft of political issues with most being the very reasons why the opposition has cried foul.


Which fundamental issues that include repealing Aippa, Posa, redress of land tenure, judicial independence, and reengagement with the international community, will help economic recovery without threatening the existence of Zanu PF?


How would the unpopular Zanu PF regime clobber the MDC without telling its supporters lies that it is a British-sponsored party?


How would it separate the anti-British rhetoric from the mainstream anti-Western mantra? How would Zanu PF appease the working class who still believe the election was smartly stolen?


Truly, I don’t understand the learned economist on the so-called economic recovery roadmap.


President Mugabe was on the SABC News soon after the “landslide victory” reaffirming his desire to keep Aippa and Posa as his weapons to suppress dissent.


Most of the things that Bloch wants resolved are political though he wants to present them as economic science.


The only impetus for a successful economic recovery programme is a constitutional reform programme that addresses the imbalances between the legislature, executive and the judiciary, particularly during this phase we are going through.


We don’t need an economic recovery programme but a political programme to see us through the control freak that President Mugabe has become.


Brov Musonza,

Harare.