Ariston Hldgs in move to meet export demand

Roadwin Chirara

HORTICULUTURAL company, Ariston Holdings, has invested in a vegetable project in Shamva as part of its effort to meet export demand.



tica, sans-serif”>The company is reported to be enjoying an increase in export volumes to its European markets.


The company’s financial director, Nick Grant, confirmed that they had invested in a vegetable project in Shamva.


He said this was part of the company’s effort to meet market demand and their realisation that they would derive significant earnings from the investment.


“We have invested in a farm and vegetables project in Shamva. It’s a significant input into the sector,” said Grant.


He said the company’s export volumes had increased considerably but factors such as the current rate of exchange on exports was hindering viability.


“We are finding things very tough as our export volumes continue to be undermined by the current rates offered to exporters,” said Grant.


He, however, said the company was looking at maintaining its current export volumes as part of its long-term view.


“We hope to maintain our current rates of exports and looking at the markets in the long-term we hope this will be possible,” said Grant.


He said their outgrower scheme was now beginning to bear fruit as their contribution was rising.


“We implemented an outgrower scheme in the Eastern Highlands for coffee and this has grown significantly contributing 20% to the company’s export volumes,” said Grant.


Ariston’s investments come at a time when the local horticultural sector is facing collapse because of the current exchange regime and loss of lucrative European markets.


Murray Roberts’ horticultural company, Bonazim, is a recent victim.

Bonazim failed to renew its export contract to Europe.


The situation has resulted in the operations of the company being threatened since the market contributed 90% of the company’s earnings.