MDC leaders unfazed by Mugabe’s threats

LEADERS of both factions of the MDC were unrelenting this week in their calls for President Robert Mugabe to step down despite his statement that he would crack down on any attempts to remove him from power.


In messages to mark 2

6 years of Zimbabwe’s Independence, the leader of the anti-senate faction, Morgan Tsvangirai, threatenened mass protests saying Mugabe should “be nudged” into leaving office while pro-senate president, Arthur Mutambara, said the country was ripe for revolution and demanded that the president resign.


“There is no point in continuing to watch with trepidation a small nationalistic class, aided by a corrupt and parasitic bureaucracy and supported by desperate opportunists wreak havoc on the national cake. We are ready to pay the prize to liberate ourselves,” said Tsvangirai.


His rival in the opposition camp said the country was in a revolutionary mood emanating from Zanu PF’s suicidal policies and called on Mugabe to step down.


“There is a revolutionary mood pregnant with expectations in the country. The people of Zimbabwe will not accept anything short of a revolution,” said Mutambara.


He added: “We demand an end to the national economic crisis today. We demand the immediate resignation of the entire Zanu PF government today. The people of Zimbabwe must rule themselves again”.


Both Tsvangirai and Mutambara claimed that since Independence in 1980, Zanu PF had worked against the ideals of the liberation struggle resulting in large-scale suffering.


Delivering his speech on Tuesday to mark Independence Day, Mugabe warned against protests aimed at pressuring him out of office.


He also said the country’s security forces would be used to “mercilessly” deal with the opposition leaders and their supporters.


“I want to warn them that they are playing with fire,” said Mugabe. The president has previously warned those calling for his removal that they would be “dicing with death”.


Tsvangirai and Mutambara bemoaned the migration of Zimbabweans to other countries to work under harsh conditions as they escape their country’s economic collapse.


“The people are desperate to get out. There is too much poverty and too little growth,” said Tsvangirai.


Mutambara went on to demand the vote for all those in the diaspora. He said there is need for investor confidence-building measures through working with strategic partners in Western countries for the economy to recover. — Staff Writer.

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