Pamire/Mandaza in court battle

Loughty Dube

HARARE businessman and publisher Ibbo Mandaza and former Zifa chairman Vincent Pamire and his wife are embroiled in a legal battle over the ownership of butchery and a block of flats in Bulawayo

that both claim to have purchased from a dispossessed white commercial farmer.



The standoff over the ownership of the property in Makokoba township of Bulawayo dates back to 2002. The matter has now been taken to the Bulawayo High Court where Vincent Pamire and his wife Evelyn are seeking an eviction order against Mandaza who has been using the properties since 2001.



According to papers filed with the High Court in Bulawayo, Pamire, through his lawyers Sibusiso Ndlovu & Partners, wants Mandaza evicted from the premises for failure to pay rentals as from October 2002.


The Pamires say they purchased all of the shares of Mazilikazi Investments (Pvt) Ltd, a company that comprises the butchery and a block of residential flats, from Charles William Hammer-Nel in October 2002.


Mandaza, who has been renting the butchery from Hammer-Nel, also alleges that he bought the properties for $1,4 million from the white farmer in 2001 but says Hammer-Nel has been evasive and has refused to sign papers effecting the transfer of the property.


Mandaza is also involved in a legal battle with Hammer-Nel over the ownership of five farms in Matabeleland North that Mandaza wants for his ambitious Induba Development Trust.


“I however believe that there is more to this as this is not the only war I am fighting with Hammer-Nel. I am in the Harare High Court right now under Case Numbers HC 10487/02 and HC 1597/03 fighting the same person over the sale of his five farms on which he carried out his ranching,” say papers filed by Mandaza in his defence.


“It is the sale of the ranches which founded the basis upon which the butchery was also sold to me. Hammer-Nel has tried to frustrate the transfer of the farms in exactly the same way he is trying to frustrate the transfer of the stand in question. I believe therefore that Pamire and the wife are just but another Hammer-Nel front,” the defence outline says.


However, attached copies from Hammer Nel’s lawyers indicate that the farmer has been struggling since 2001 to get rentals from Mandaza.

Supporting papers filed with the High Court indicate that Vincent and Evelyn Pamire, through one of their companies, SK Fencing (Pvt) Ltd, bought all shares in Crocker Funeral Services in 2002. Crocker then changed its name to Mazilikazi Investments (Pvt) Ltd the same year.


“The plaintiff (Pamire) seeks an order to evict Mandaza and all those who claim through him, from a butchery situated at Makokoba township Bulawayo. Plaintiff is now the registered owner of the building wherein situated the butchery which is occupied by the defendant,” the court papers say.


The Pamires want Mandaza forcibly evicted from the premises as they say other means to have him moved have failed.


The controversial publisher is also involved in a war of words with Matabeleland North governor Obert Mpofu on the one hand over his stalled Induba Development Project while on the other hand he is embroiled in a legal battle with settlers camped on one of the five farms in dispute.