ZC wants minister to appoint directors

THE proposed Zimbabwe Cricket (ZC) constitution, if passed, will empower the government to appoint seven out of the association’s 12 board members for a four-year term. The draft constitution was presented to delegates from the new 10 provincial associat

ions now constituting the structures of ZC at an explosive stakeholders’ meeting held in Mutare last weekend.


Only five board members will be elected by the provincial associations as stipulated by the constitution.


Article 11, subsection 3 of the draft constitution reads:


“Of the 12 board members mentioned above (in subsection 2), seven shall be appointed by the Minister (of Education Sports and Culture) and the remaining five shall be appointed by the provincial associations as outlined in section 16.”


The five elected positions on the board will be rotational, as specified by Article 15, subsection (b).


“Of the five directors elected by the provincial chairpersons, two shall retire at the expiration of the first half of the term of the board and the electoral college of the 10 provincial chairpersons shall elect two new members from amongst themselves or their associations to replace the two retired members who will serve the remaining half of the term.”


The seven government appointees will serve a full term of four years.


While the constitution is well defined in requirement for cricket experience as minimum qualifications for board positions, such as Test or ODI experience, five years first-class cricket playing and/ or umpiring experience, or three years previous ZC board experience or experience in cricket administration, it includes alternative criteria like a first degree or equivalent qualification.


“Some of the conditions are tailor-made to suit certain people who government is likely to appoint,” said a highly placed official who lambasted the draft constitution.


Sources who attended the day-long meeting in Mutare told of shocking “power-seeking” after some provincial delegates even wanted their ten associations to automatically take up 10 of the posts on the ZC board.


A top ZC official who spoke off the record, however, defended the draft constitution, saying it has been necessitated by the “stability” brought to cricket through government intervention. In January, government though the Sports and Recreation Commission, dissolved a divided ZC substantive board and appointed an interim committee. The official claimed government’s involvement would result in diverse representation in ZC.


The constitution also limits the power of its affiliate provinces, making it illegal for them (in Article 10, subsection 5) to pass a vote of no confidence in the national board or any of its members.


The new ZC constitution has to be in place before the board elections, which are scheduled before the August 31 deadline. The provincial associations, whose own draft constitutions were also presented at the Mutare meeting, have to complete their own documents and executive elections before the ZC polls. — Staff Writer.