Assaults too commonplace, why single out Chinamasa?

I HAVE had to wait this long to let the dust settle and make a few observations about the excitement and restlessness in Zimbabwe that took siege of our lovely country following the alleged assault of appointed member of parliament Patric

k Chinamasa by publicly elected MP Roy Bennett.


I believe seeing the situation from outside I managed to see salient points that many missed in the mouthings that followed this skirmish.


Those with degrees in violence could not stomach the ugly reality of violence. Was it not condemned in language most heartfelt and unequivocal? Yet that violence is too commonplace against dissenting views in Zimbabwe for one case to be singled out, and what was more to have so much prominence placed on it.


I had thought I had heard of a scheme by those that pretend to lead this country that it was time to instill fear into white men’s hearts. I remember President Mugabe saying something to that effect before I flew to the UK where I stay with white people and a white family. It is also from here that Mugabe wants to see me expatriating foreign currency.


There is good and bad in any colour. Listening to Mugabe makes one want to laugh at the things he says but you immediately feel sorry for him at his age, hanging on to power by the skin of his teeth.


If violence is acceptable given his degrees in it, the plot to instill fear, or the possibility of death befalling MDC leader Morgan Tsvangirai, then what is it that we must lose sleep over?


The land reform programme is an issue above partisan dialogue. The resources of this country for which many a friend died to liberate are a sacred resource too precious to be divided behind closed doors. The distribution pattern should reflect the ultimate victory of the former oppressed over those that confiscated it from our ancestry in colonial times.

In this modern and highly capitalised life we are what we have. Programmes performed by those that resist leaving public office to amass wealth in the name of the nationalist agenda are non-starters. The false illusion that influential people can use national causes to deepen an already existing resource distribution pattern in our name will not be sustained.


I am 27 years old and our generation has no time for the nonsense we see before us today. Again I must tell you that our Independence and freedom is far more important to us than ways, formalities and recognised practices we get it through.


Elections or no elections we will lead our own road to freedom this time. There is a time when dialogue comes to its natural end. The right to vote minus the choice is a daylight democratic sham. Choices are made freely hence advice has never been mandatory.


What happened to Chinamasa happens everyday to the people of Zimbabwe. Now Zanu PF realises how unethical it is to be abused even if you are at par with that person. It can be right to have violence between the electorate and be wrong between people chosen by them? If violence was bad for Zanu PF then it was a wake-up call – it’s bad for everyone else.

I must hasten to add that as we articulate resource ownership reform, the unadulterated version yet to come, we need compulsory pension remittances for the farm workers. Their wages should be made through a state facility to avoid under-payment. We must also have an independent farm workers complaints commission, standard accommodation, profit-sharing incentives and accessible, affirmative and enforceable working conditions regulations.


I have started mobilising sup-port and resources for this campaign and may be contacted at courageshumba@yahoo.com as I work for a free fair motherland, beautiful Zimbabwe.


Courage Shumba,

Nyika Vanhu Foundation Trust,

UK.