Let Nkomo speak for himself

I AM one of the people who truly value the sacrifices that the late vice-president Joshua Nkomo went through to liberate our country from the bondage of the racist minority colonial governments.



a, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Last month the sprawling border town of Beitbridge was host to yet another gala to commemorate the life of Nkomo.


I have taken time to re-read his autobiography, Nkomo: The Story of My Life – the book that he wrote while in exile during those not-so-sweet days of our history. To my greatest astonishment, the number of people who requested to borrow the book as soon as they saw it was beyond my imagination.


I recall a member of the uniformed forces literally begging to remain with the book when he heard I would be travelling out of the country. He was not the only one.


Virtually no one linked Umdala Wethu with the Beitbridge gala that was shown live on television besides talking about how some skimpily dressed musicians danced raunchily for a largely drinking audience – something the good old man never did the whole of his life.


I was then perturbed to hear that the gala had gobbled over $230 million. Are we therefore celebrating his life by spending so much only in one night and forgetting the next gala?


I feel otherwise. I would suggest that we use that money to print more books that he has written so that as many Zimbabweans will read the visions of this great man.


In his two books, Nkomo: The Story of My Life and The New Zimbabwe, Nkomo takes us down memory lane as well as pave the way forward for this great nation, which unfortunately some people want to deliberately ignore.


Let Umdala Wethu speak for himself! If we really mean what we say about him, his books should be part of our school syllabus in history. As a retired teacher of the subject it pains me that I taught so little about him. Now that the information is readily available, let the truth set us free.


Yes, the truth shall set us free.


Webster Zambara,

Gutu.